Greater Than or Equal to in Excel

In Excel, the greater than or equal to (>=) logical operator compares two cells that contain the same data types.

The greater than equal to operator uses the “>=” symbol and returns the TRUE or FALSE value.

Example:

  • If value1 is greater than equal to than value2, the result is TRUE
  • If value1 is less than value2, the result is FALSE.

You can use the “greater than or equal to” operator to compare various data types. These are:

  • numbers,
  • dates,
  • date and time values
  • text

Logical operators return boolean type values: TRUE or FALSE, so by checking these outputs, you can decide easily.

How to use the “Greater Than or Equal To” operator in Excel

The following examples help you to better understand how to use these operators for comparison purposes in Excel.

Example 1. – “Greater Than” and “Greater Than or Equal to”

Our data set uses the range B3:B8, which contains numerical values. The comparison is simple. Test whether the given value is greater than 150 or not! So, in cell E3, you can find the criteria.

greater than excel data table

Type and equal sign in the formula bar and enter the formula: =B3>= $E$3. Because cell E3 is a constant, you should use absolute reference. Copy the formula down:

=B3>=$E$3

greater than example

Let us see another example: change the operator to greater than equal to (>= ) and evaluate the formula again:

use the greater than equal to operator - excel example

Using the greater than or equal to operator returns TRUE in cell C5. Because the test contains an equal operator, the comparison result is TRUE.

Example 2. – Using IF formula and “Greater Than or Equal to”

Let us combine the “greater than or equal to” comparison operator with the IF function in the example.

Example: In column B, you can find the prices. The logical test works based on these conditions: If the price is >= 2500, the price will reduce by 5%. If the price is < 2500, the value remains the same.

Enter the formula: =IF(B3>=2500, B3*0.95, B3)

greater than or equal to if function example
  1. Locate the formula bar and type and equal sign (=)
  2. Enter the IF function and open a bracket
  3. The first argument of the function is the logical test. In this case, B3 is greater than equal to (>=) 2500.
  4. Type a comma and enter the second argument, B3 * 0,95
  5. In cell B3, if the logical test is TRUE, the formula applies a price reduction of 5%.
  6. Type a comma, and add the third argument; what will happen, if the value is less than 2500
  7. If the test is FALSE, the formula will keep the original price untouched.
  8. Close the bracket and press Enter

Copy the formula down:

In cell B7, the value is $2499, so the result is FALSE based on the logical test. However, the value in cell C7 remains the original. Therefore, the “greater than or equal to” condition is TRUE in all other cases.

true case

Example 3: Use SUMIF function if the date is “greater than equal to”

In Excel, working with dates and logical operators is not rocket science.

In this example, our table contains order dates and the daily revenue. You want to summarize the revenue if the order date is greater than equal to December 14, 2021.

sumif example

Enter the formula =SUMIF(B3:B8,”>=”&DATE(2021,12,14),C3:C8)

  1. Locate the formula bar and type and equal sign (=)
  2. Enter the SUMIF function and open a bracket
  3. The function’s first argument is the range, where we find the date. In this case, we will test the dates in column B, greater than or equal to December 14, 2021.
  4. Type a comma and enter the criteria, “>=” &DATE(2021,12,14)
  5. Type a comma, and add the third argument; the sum_range, in this case, range C3:C8
  6. Close the bracket and press Enter

Example 4: COUNTIF function and logical operators

In the example, you want to count the records in column C, where the revenue is greater than equal to $2000.

Formula:

=COUNTIF(C3:C8,”>=”&2000)

COUNTIF function and logical operators
  1. Locate the formula bar and type and equal sign (=)
  2. Enter the COUNTIF function and open a bracket
  3. The first argument is the range, where we find the value that will compare to the criteria.
  4. Type a comma and enter the criteria, “>=” &2000
  5. Close the bracket and press Enter

Copy the formula down and check the result. The result is =3 because only three values are greater than or equal to 2000.

Example 5: Working with Text values

It is not a great idea to use the “greater than or equal to” operator for text values if you are working with Excel.

In the example, cell A1 contains “apple” and the text in cell B1 is “banana.” Type the A1>= B1 formula.

The result is FALSE. It would be great to know why. Excel uses a simple algorithm (alphabetic order of characters) to decide which text is “greater than equal to.” The minimum value is “a,” the maximum value is “z.”

Here are some text-related comparison examples:

What if both texts begin with the same characters? Excel checks the second character, and so on. We’ve just demonstrated that using the “greater than or equal to” operator is not the best method to compare.

greater than or equal to text comparison example

Wrapping things up

How to define the “greater than or equal to” logical operator in Excel?

The operator (>=) returns TRUE if the first value is greater than or equal to the second value. If not, Excel returns with FALSE. For example, the formula =A1>=COUNT(B2:B10) gets TRUE if the value in cell A1 is greater than or equal to the count of values in the range B2:B10. Conversely, if the value in cell A1 is less than the criteria, it returns FALSE.

In which cases should you use the “greater than or equal to” operator in Excel?

Possible actions:
– Compare two values.
– Find the value in a range that is equal to the criteria.
– Finally, test a number that is met the given criteria or does not.

Should I use the “greater than or equal to” operator for text comparison purposes?

No. Absolutely not recommended.

Download the example

That was our quick guide on how the “greater than or equal to” operator works. If you want to practice, download the examples and look at the used formulas and functions.

Istvan Vozar

Istvan is the co-founder of Excelkid. He writes blog posts and helps people to reach the top in Excel.